Five Self Care Tips for Winter

Traditional Chinese medicine teaches that humans should live in harmony with the seasons. According to traditional Chinese medicine there are five seasons: winter, spring, summer, late summer and fall. Each season has many associations that help us change our habits, allowing for a more balanced mind and body. When these systems were being developed, people were living in harmony with nature. People rose with the sun, ate what was available during the different seasons and they were much more aware of their natural environment. What to wear, when to wake up, when to go to sleep and what activities to engage in were all dependent on the weather and the environment. Because of this, people were capable of staying healthy throughout the year and their immune and organ systems were strong enough to ward off disease. continue reading »

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3 Reasons Acupuncture Supports Couples Facing Infertility

When you consider all the changes in our agricultural practices, the increased number of medications we take, as well as our dependence on plastic and technology that is constantly emitting low-grade radiation, it’s no surprise more couples are having trouble conceiving. Current statistics show one in six couples who are trying to conceive are facing fertility issues. And while many times infertility is thought of as a female issue, it is really a factor for both the man and woman and should therefore be addressed as such. continue reading »

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Acupuncture for Kids

Most kids, as well as a lot of adults, are afraid of needles. So the pairing of acupuncture and kids might not be an obvious one. However, more and more parents are seeking alternative methods of treatment for their children, because our conventional medical system is faltering a bit. Pharmaceuticals are proving to be more harmful than beneficial for many people, especially kids, whose brains and bodies aren’t yet fully developed. continue reading »

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Acupoints For Fall

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because the lungs are one of the organ systems correlated with fall in traditional Chinese medicine, lung acupuncture points can be beneficial at this time of year. In this article we’ll look at two common lung acupoints and what they’re good for.

Lung 7

In classical texts, this point is revered as one of the four most important and useful points on the body. Lung 7 is also called Broken Sequence. This may sound like an unusual name for an acupuncture point, but it is in reference to the pathway of the lung channel where it splits to join the large intestine channel. Traditionally, Qi is transferred from one channel to another at the last point on the channel, but in the case of the lung channel, lung 7, not lung 11, is where the Qi is transferred, hence the break in the sequence.

Lung 7 is the main point for moving and regulating the Qi in the lung meridian. It can be useful for treating coughs, asthma, chest tightness and pain, shortness of breath and wheezing. It can also be used to treat chronic sore throats. This point can also relax the diaphragm and can help with chronic hiccups. For allergy sufferers, this point can be effective in treating common hay fever symptoms.

Lung 7 is also the command point for the head and the back of the neck. That means this point can be used to treat myriad conditions related to the head and neck. Lung 7 can release pain and stiffness in the neck, ease dull headaches, help with anxiety and help someone think more clearly.

Lung 3

Lung 3 is classically named Tian Fu. Tian can be translated to mean celestial or of the heavens. Fu can be translated here to mean storehouse or treasury. The most common translation for Lung 3 is celestial storehouse. The point itself is below the axillary fold on the radial side of the biceps brachii tendon. This is about three inches below the armpit and five inches above the elbow.

Lung 3 is classified as a window of the sky point, and has the function of regulating the flow of Qi between the body and the head. This point can also disperse stuck Qi in the chest for people who experience a shortness of breath, especially due to smoke inhalation or carbon monoxide poisoning. Needling Lung 3 will help them take deeper breaths and get more oxygen into their bodies.

One of the most common uses of Lung 3 is for spiritual issues of a wide range of manifestations. It can effectively treat insomnia as well as help people who sleep too much. This point is also used to treat confusion, poor memory, crying, depression and fear of ghosts. Traditionally, it was used to treat patients with tuberculosis. When the tuberculosis became severe and there was chronic depletion of the lung yin, patients would experience “floating corpse ghost talk,” basically delirious speech, which is where the treatment of fear of ghosts comes from.

Each acupuncture point is connected to many other areas and systems within the body, allowing it to be beneficial for a wide range of issues. Ask me today if you have questions on these or other points.

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Five Self Care Tips for Fall

Fall is a favorite season for many people. The weather starts getting a little cooler, things are beginning to slow down and preparations for the holidays are in full swing. For many others, fall is not so festive. Many people get sick during the fall months, allergies can flare up for some, and many don’t like the steady decrease in hours of sunlight, sometimes leading to seasonal depression. Here are some tips on how to get through the season without incident. continue reading »

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